Innovation in the Legal World and the Need for a New Perspective

Innovation in the Legal World and the Need for a New Perspective

In the wake of several high profile data breaches that have recently occurred, the public eye has turned its crosshairs on the outdated technology and clichéd business practices that exist in the legal world.

Legal firms have tried to keep up with the developing technological needs of their industry, but their efforts have traditionally fallen short. With practices deeply rooted in tradition and held sacred by many lawyers, innovation in the legal world is scarce.

Law as Business

The most recent Inside Counsel SuperConference held on May 12th of this year discussed the need for technological improvements in the legal world, with many industry insiders agreeing that law firms must function more as businesses and apply a new mindset to the way they handle in-house counsel.

Legal firms on the cutting edge have already been using technology to inform their legal practice in the same ways that businesses have. By gathering data on legal competition and using predictive analytics to measure future outcomes, firms have received an enhanced level of insight into the legal process that outdated firms can’t match. Pairing these business practices with in-house legal goals means better informed lawyers, more prepared counsel, and a stronger overall firm.picjumbo.com_9814538046_86523fdb81_o

“Technology is pervasive,” said David Cambria, global director of operations and government relations at Archer Daniels Midland Company. “I think you are going to see a lot of adoption of technologies or ideas in lot of places …Innovation is a message that resonates with any business.”

Developing Innovation

Lawyers entering the industry fresh out of law school bring with them changing trends for the legal world.

Many of the practicing lawyers received their education well before the advent of the Internet, creating a legal environment where new and innovative technology isn’t prioritized. However, young lawyers whose legal training went hand-in-hand with technology use are bringing changes to the way legal counsel is handled though social media outreach, more efficient data management, and productivity-saving applications.

While firms resistant to change may hold off on implementing new technology until they can verify its efficacy, they may find that by the time they’re ready for change, they’re already too late. Early adoption is a key part of innovation. Technology is developing fast, and legal firms that don’t want to fall behind must stay ahead of the curve.

Our endeavor at iBridge is to provide a forum for firm leadership to dialogue as they weigh transformation strategies. While it easy for someone from the outside to preach on change, facilitating change while keeping the firm solvent and growing is difficult. We can offer counsel and guide the process. Contacting us or calling us at 888.490.3282 is the first step in the right direction.

Desh Urs iBridge LLC

Written by Desh Urs

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decision Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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How Big Data Complexity Is Redefining Legal Tech

How Big Data Complexity Is Redefining Legal Tech

The volume of data accumulated daily in any law practice is massive, and continues growing annually. This, combined with the increase in technological evolution seen in the legal industry, are together reshaping the face of daily business within a law firm. But is technology changing the legal space, or is the legal industry affecting the development of legal technology instead?2M1AXEU9Q2

The Chicken or Egg Argument

The age-old question over which came first for the chicken and the egg has a lot in common with technology vs. legal industry debate. Unlike chickens, though, technology and transformation within the legal industry take place simultaneously, with each mutually informing the other.

New tech entrants into the marketplace focus on legal disruption, responding to the drive from clients. Changing the way resources are structured takes priority. This not only involves concerns over the sheer volume of data accumulating, but also the increased complexity in keeping up with regulations and compliance mandates.

Data does not exist in a vacuum. For law firms particularly, data must be filtered in a usable way, converting raw information to knowledge. This is just as true for gap analysis during contract management as it is for fact development for a case. A greater understanding must be reached about the best way to collect and manage data within an organization, adopting an approach that works for the daily needs of the business.

One Size Does Not Fit All

None of this should imply there is a “one-size-fits-all” solution for big data management. Instead, the solution lies in implementing various tools and platforms that are flexible enough to work for a range of different client needs. Applying the tactics to the concept, document or data at hand accomplishes clients’ goals, as disparate as they may be.

The traditional legal model is cumbersome and time-consuming, qualities that do not lend themselves well to today’s fast-paced working environment. Clients, boards and shareholders want more comprehensive results, and want those results faster. To do this, start by understanding client risks, then draft a solution designed to meet those specific needs.

The legal industry can no longer claim that technology capable of this level of flexibility does not exist. Instead, legal departments must adopt a culture of technology that lends itself to better process management regarding today’s reality of handling big data.

Desh

Written by Desh Urs

Desh Urs brings more than 20 years of entrepreneurial, start-up and Global 500 corporate experience in sales, marketing and general management to the customers of iBridge. He has led sales organizations as SVP at Qsent, Inc. and VP at Acxiom Corporation, and has focused on the usage of data in data distribution, direct marketing, fraud prevention, and law enforcement.

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decision Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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Legal Technology: The Shift Towards Digital Discovery and Data Analytics

Legal Technology: The Shift Towards Digital Discovery and Data Analytics

New technology and discovery practices are changing the landscape for legal professionals. Legal firms are taking a page out of the marketing research manual and exploring the value of data analytics for eDiscovery and case management.

This comes when firms are realizing that traditional methods of data management are falling by the wayside in favor of the wealth of information available through digital means. Recognizing the trends of data discovery and the importance of keeping up with these patterns is causing more firms to devote a larger share of their financial resources towards IT development and the associated practices for digital discovery. To best utilize technology for managing client cases and cost reduction, data analytics are being applied in ways never before used by legal firms.

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The Measure of Analytics

Data analytics were seen only as a measure to improve cost management and savings, but the potential applications of these metrics goes beyond mere budget reduction. Providing more funding for technology-related purposes is part of a larger shift towards digital information governance. This shift will create better tracking of risk management, improved decision making, heightened security of privileged information and better overall contributions towards the goals of the firm.

The value of digital analytics for legal firms is becoming widely recognized, but industry standards have yet to emerge for their practice and application. These standards will establish a framework and mitigate the risks involved with their use, but are developed through a time consuming process of trial and error. Legal firms that take initiative to blaze the trail for establishing digital discovery practices may reap benefits greater than those that are slower to adapt.

The Future of Legal Technology

As eDiscovery shifts from a growing trend to the new normal, patterns emerge that dictate how metrics can be used to analyze aggregate information and provide a comprehensive view of a client case.

Legal firms must manage both the client outcome and costs associated with legal work, but data analytics have not yet been utilized to their full effect in either area. With the primary focus of analytics being on cost savings, the benefits to case work and discovery are areas that require further research before they are utilized.

Desh

Written by Desh Urs

Desh Urs brings more than 20 years of entrepreneurial, start-up and Global 500 corporate experience in sales, marketing and general management to the customers of iBridge. He has led sales organizations as SVP at Qsent, Inc. and VP at Acxiom Corporation, and has focused on the usage of data in data distribution, direct marketing, fraud prevention, and law enforcement.

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decision Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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Data Metrics: The Future of Privacy in a Transparent World

Data Metrics: The Future of Privacy in a Transparent World

Data analytics for human resources is a burgeoning field that has both positive and negative implications for the safety of user data. While data mining of personal information is nothing new, how responsibly this information is handled is essential to the future of eDiscovery.

Analytics and clickstream data are being collected on whoever uses the Internet, providing fractional pieces of your digital footprint to corporations able to pay top dollar for the privilege of its use. While it sounds sordid to imagine your every move being tracked by data collection algorithms that know you as well as you know yourself, the implications of this trend are not always negative.

Applications of Analytics

Companies use these analytics to deliver customized content to your screen and offer suggestions based on your location and previous input, which can streamline the user experience and save time for everyone involved.

Analyzing Business Data

Image Courtesy of adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Beyond the consumer applications, workplaces have used this data mining to offer predictive insight on employee performance. By monitoring email communications, Internet use and screen tracking, employers can gain a broad view of how employees utilize their time and determine where security threats may lie. A new trend called “sentiment analysis” is also being developed, allowing human resource agencies to monitor the mental and physical health of employees via their communications and increase potential detection of medical issues.

These measures should mitigate risks and losses both from inside the workplace and out, but they may come at a cost. The silent hoarding of personal user data by businesses is often viewed as a draconian practice that brings to mind the Orwellian specter of “Big Brother” having eyes on us. This fear stresses the importance of informed consent and fair use of the data collected.

Regulation and Consent

The legal statutes that dictate how electronic personal information is disseminated vary across countries. These regulations are often blanket clauses designed to protect users with the requirement of informed consent, but in the countries such as the United States, this becomes more complex.

U.S. regulations are often pieced together from various federal and state clauses. The Fair Credit Reporting Act offers protection from unmonitored dissemination of data through a clause of “permissible purposes” that must be provided by third-parties. In 1998, the Federal Trade Commission applied The Fair Information Practice Principles as another method to protect the online privacy of users. These regulations involve:

  • Transparency of record keeping systems and access to information gathered
  • Ability of users to guarantee that information gathered for a purpose is not applied for other purposes without consent
  • Records must be able to be amended or corrected by the users
  • Responsibility of organizations to prevent misuse of data and ensure accuracy

However, this clause only applies to data and may not apply to internal information gathered from online corporations or private businesses. Human resource departments are synthesizing analytics from both internal and external sources to give an overall portrait of an employee’s performance and level of risk.

While this can be effective in offering objective data about the implied efficiency of an employee, minimizing monitoring may be more effective in recruiting ideal employees. With so much of our personal data being available for corporate use in employee profiling, it is essential to carefully manage how these risks are disclosed to employees and how consent is given from everyone involved.

Sofia

Written by Sofia Johnson, Manager, Software Development

Ms. Johnson, an expert in Project and Resource Management, is the Software Development Manager at iBridge. She brings 11 plus years of IT work experience and business intelligence to provide successful customer engagement of software development. Prior to working at iBridge, Johnson worked as a Senior Engineer for Hewlett Packard and Oracle, and a Hyperion Consultant for IBM and Google.

She is a product expert in enterprise contract management software solutions – diCarta/IBM Emptoris. As part of her previous engagements as a Hyperion Consultant, she made significant contributions to optimize and enhance a BI/Analytic solution for a major food, health and home retailer, LoBlaw, in Canada. She introduced performance tuning and optimization principles to the existing solution by leveraging Essbase cube partitioning techniques and re-writing some of the calculation logic to bring in significant performance improvements. Another significant engagement included automation and enhancement deliveries of a Hyperion analytical solution for a South African multinational brewing and beverage company (SABMiller) headquartered in London, England.

Ms. Johnson is a certified Essbase developer with a Master’s degree Computer Applications from Bangalore University. She has immense passion for travel, reading and working for social causes.

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Can Old Laws Handle New Technology?

Can Old Laws Handle New Technology?

With the increasing availability of apps that do everything from tracking caloric intake while dieting to monitoring sleep habits to optimize your morning wakeup, it was only a matter of time until fully wearable gadgetry caught on. Now, with the exploding popularity of innovations like Fitbit and other wearables, valid questions about where privacy, legality and health habits all intersect are an open discussion.

Source: freedigitalphotos.net

The Future of Wearables

The estimated revenue for the wearable device market is $1.6 billion; projections are this number will more than triple as early as 2016. If the success of the ever-expanding smartphone and tablet market (which last year topped $66 billion) is any indicator, then wearable devices are perfectly poised to be the next big thing.

Forward-thinking tech companies—like Apple with its heavily anticipated iWatch release, or Google, which has scheduled mass distribution of Google Glass for later this year—are planning for success for the wearables market. However, how do these same companies protect the highly personal information that such devices track, collect, and store?

Healthcare and Privacy Concerns

For every wildly enthusiastic endorsement of wearable tech, there are at least an equal number of detractors, especially regarding privacy concerns. Consumers can receive, transmit and share more data than ever, and almost instantaneously. Even when this occurs with the causal intention of interacting with friends or tracking your own health and exercise habits, the fact remains that any stored, transmitted, or shared data is potentially vulnerable to access by an unauthorized party.

The implications of this information being accessible even to a legitimate outside organization are widespread. Should an insurance company have access to blood sugar levels as recorded and transmitted by insulin pumps? Could an employer monitor exercise levels as part of their own insurance provision requirements? Is the consumer unaware of third party agreements in place, which allow access to this data?

Wearables and Legal Rights

As is typical with technology-related concerns, the legal world is struggling to keep up with wearable tech. Stretching old laws to apply to new tech is one solution, while in others the need is clear for new more applicable language. In the meantime, legal counsel and consumer are trying to find how to create a world where wearables and privacy rights can peacefully coexist.

This scenario is nothing new as far as the battle between development and litigation.  Back in 1890, the legal world was very concerned over introducing handheld cameras. How could anyone feel safe when a newspaper photographer could capture an image in a private space and publish that image the next day? The technology was invasive–an obvious intrusion into an individuals’ expected right to privacy.

Now, more than a century later the only thing that has changed is the name of that gadget. As with handheld cameras, the law can and will adapt to reflect the changing times.

Written by Simeon D. Rapoport

Simeon D. Rapoport is the Vice President & General Counsel for iBridge. He’s been an attorney for more than 25 years, began his career working in the courts and private practice for more than 10 years, and has been in-house corporate counsel since 1998. Rapoport’s experience includes private practice with the large West Coast firm of Bullivant Houser and more than 10 years at Standard Insurance Company. Rapoport is a frequent author and speaker, and he enjoys being active in Bar and civic groups. His interests include family, fitness, outdoor activities, and travel.

iBridge & the 37th Annual International Legal Technology Association Educational Conference

iBridge & the 37th Annual International Legal Technology Association Educational Conference

Leading West Coast information management and data services firm iBridge will attend and exhibit at the 37th Annual International Legal Technology Association (ILTA) Educational Conference.

iBridge offerings include a full spectrum of eDiscovery and other legal support services. The conference takes place at the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville, Tenn. iBridge will be partnering with Lucid IQ, an ILTA Conference Gold Sponsor, and Sim Rapoport, Vice President & General Counsel for iBridge, will be attending the event. iBridge will be located at Booth No. 200 with Lucid IQ.

“Because this is a cutting edge program on legal technology issues, we’re looking forward to hearing from all the great speakers in addition to learning more about these technology issues,” said Rapoport.

The conference will have over 200 peer-developed educational sessions, ample networking opportunities, more than 200 exhibiting vendors and much more. It will cover topics such as information management, organization management, desktop applications, technology operations, and the future of ILTA initiatives.

About ILTA

“For more than three decades, the International Legal Technology Association has led the way in sharing knowledge and experience for those faced with challenges in their firms and legal departments. Through delivery of educational content and peer-networking opportunities, ILTA provides members information resources in order to make technology work for the legal profession.”

The conference will include hands-on, interactive audience participation, case studies, advanced curriculum, roundtables, lecture presentations and panel discussions. Conference participants will have the opportunity to discuss best practices in an environment of open collaboration, the convenience of exploring myriad technology and process solutions under one roof, and the potential to deliver great value to their firm or law department.

About iBridge

iBridge is a team of trusted, responsive information experts who capture, normalize, mine and report data to help organizations make smarter business decisions. By cutting through the data noise, iBridge provides critical information to its customers, allowing them to better understand their opportunities. iBridge’s value is in its ability to solve business problems in collaboration with its customers; to rapidly scale up or down; and to integrate its teams with client organizations. In addition to its information management services, iBridge offers eDiscovery and legal support. The company has offices in Oregon, Washington and India.

To learn more about iBridge and its services, call 888.490.3282. You can also visit ibridgellc.com or connect with it via Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Google Plus.

Why It’s Time for Law Firms to Get Real about Data Security

Why It’s Time for Law Firms to Get Real about Data Security

Source: freedigitalphotos.net/Renjith Krishnan

Source: freedigitalphotos.net/Renjith Krishnan

When it comes to data security, law firms are facing two distinct disadvantages. First, the legal industry seems to lag behind other fields somewhat when it comes to technology in general; not every member of the old guard sees the need to learn new tricks. And secondly, there’s no industry-wide standard when it comes to data security requirements for sensitive information. This combination all too often leaves law practices severely lacking when it comes to protecting data, leading experts to refer to law firms as the “soft underbelly” when it comes to cyber security. Is this a fair designation, or are law firms more self-aware than that?

Technological Savvy

Although of course new case law is created on a regular basis, the truth is that the vast majority of legal expertise lies in examining and reexamining the same information again and again. This can give the impression—sometimes even to those within the legal profession—that not much changes when it comes to litigation, and therefore not a whole lot need to join the 21st century with regards to technology by investing significantly in a firm’s technological infrastructure. As such, to run into severely outdated computer systems in a lawyer’s office isn’t all that unusual, particularly in smaller firms that lack the financial resources of larger, more established practices.

Yet, to assume that these “rules” apply to all law firms is equally shortsighted. In reality, the past year alone has shown a dramatic uptick in security efforts from individual firms, either in an effort to adopt ISO 27001 or even stricter security standards. Initiatives like LegalSEC® are helping to develop consistent guidelines within the legal community and create security programs that are both measurable and achievable, as well as promote greater awareness about cyber security.

The Future of Legal Technology

The issue of cyber security becomes paramount when the legal industry intersects with other professions in which data protection is a chief concern. For example, clients in the financial services industry are likely to conduct security audits to ensure outside counsel’s compliance with industry-specific guidelines. These audits can even include details such as security assessments of data centers and physical files.

In short, the legal industry now finds itself positioned in a place that requires them to maintain robust security programs, acknowledge and resolve any existing vulnerabilities and be prepared to address any risks that are uncovered during a security audit. The overwhelming response has been to rapidly restructure existing operating budgets accordingly.

While the sudden IT security ramp-up may seem like an overwhelming shift, this is really only one pixel in the big picture of other changes law firms are facing: new billing practices as clients push for a move from hourly to service-based fees, the non-traditional career path of working as an independently contracted lawyer, and a number of other post-recession adaptations that allow the industry as a whole to evolve and—eventually—thrive in its new incarnation. Rest assured, those in the legal field are not the only seasoned professionals who are facing these types of challenges. Armed with a renewed awareness of the severity that a lapse in data security can represent, the legal industry is ready to face the future and get serious about data security.

Written by Simeon D. Rapoport

Simeon D. Rapoport is the Vice President & General Counsel for iBridge. He’s been an attorney for more than 25 years, began his career working in the courts and private practice for more than 10 years, and has been in-house corporate counsel since 1998. Rapoport’s experience includes private practice with the large West Coast firm of Bullivant Houser and more than 10 years at Standard Insurance Company. Rapoport is a frequent author and speaker, and he enjoys being active in Bar and civic groups. His interests include family, fitness, outdoor activities, and travel.

3 Reasons Why Law Firms Need to Take Extra Steps for Data Protection

3 Reasons Why Law Firms Need to Take Extra Steps for Data Protection

Regardless of specialization, lawyers everywhere are familiar with the concept of attorney-client privilege, and the closely related need to protect client confidentiality. Yet, a recent survey conducted by LexisNexis indicates that very few firms are actually taking steps to increase protection of sensitive data. Here are three reasons that needs to change.

1. Email Is Vulnerable

It’s a common misassumption to believe that because email accounts require passwords to log in at both ends of transmission (from both the sender’s account and the recipient’s), that email is a protected means of communication. In reality, however, emails that are sent without encryption are completely vulnerable to hackers. Although the LexisNexis survey mentioned above indicates that only a minority of firms are currently using encryption for their privileged communications, doing so would be a small step for many firms that could make a big difference in data security.

2. File Sharing Is Gaining Popularity

As the volume of data exchanged daily continues to increase, the concept of file sharing grows in popularity too. Unfortunately, the majority of respondents to the LexisNexis survey report that their preferred method of “file sharing” is—again—simply sending everything back and forth by unencrypted email. There are encrypted file sharing services and programs available that could offer an additional layer of security to sensitive data, offering greater peace of mind to attorney and client alike.

3. Confidentiality Isn’t Real Protection

A staggering number of firms—77 percent to be exact—say that they rely on the confidentiality statement at the bottom of every email as their primary defense. While this may offer some level of protection to the firm itself, the clients themselves are rarely protected by any confidentiality disclaimer… not to mention, a few sentences about privileged information doesn’t actually mean that the information contained in the email is protected in any real way from outside threats, which is a concern that needs to take on a higher priority.

Future Protection

Both clients and their attorneys need to recognize the need for heightened security when it comes to data protection. When 89 percent of firms report that their use of unencrypted email is their primary means of client communication as well as internal information exchange, the concern quickly becomes apparent. No matter what your signature line may read, the truth is that promising not to share privileged data isn’t even close to the same thing as protecting that same data against unauthorized access. It’s time for law firms to get serious about data protection in an effort to truly safeguard themselves and their clients.

Image via FreeDigitalPhotos.net/thanunkorn

10 Reasons Why You Must Invest in eDiscovery

10 Reasons Why You Must Invest in eDiscovery

For whatever reason, a number of law firms remain resistant to adopting electronic discovery  (eDiscovery) services (perhaps driven by the fear of high costs). Yet, there’s no denying that the landscape of legal technology has changed rapidly over the past few years, and shows no sign of stopping anytime soon. EDiscovery is not necessarily cost-prohibitive and you don’t need to settle your case because you think you can’t afford the eDiscovery.

eDiscovery

Here are 10 reasons why you shouldn’t let eDiscovery hold you or your case hostage:

1. Your clients have a ton of discoverable information but it’s all in digital format.

As you begin manual discovery and review on a case, perhaps you realize there’s very little physical evidence. That’s because no one bothers to print out emails anymore; instead, you’ll have to access electronically stored information (ESI) directly.

2. You’re involved in a case where opposing counsel already has extensive eDiscovery resources.

Being faced with an opponent who embraces eDiscovery could cost you your case. Electronic discovery allows for a more streamlined, sensible approach to discovery efforts compared to traditional methods. This gives the definitive upper hand to whichever party can maximize its potential.

3. Someone requests something “in native format.”

That seems easy enough… except when the native format in question is from a program that’s six years old and is now defunct. How can you handle files in native format now?

4. You need to figure out if your client has any ESI that’s relevant to the current case.

Not only do you need to verify whether your client has any relevant ESI tucked away, you also need a sensible, time-effective method to scan and categorize all those bits and bytes.

5. Opposing counsel subpoenas your client’s service provider (email host, Facebook, etc.) for discoverable data.

If opposing counsel specifically requests access to ESI, you simply can’t afford to be unprepared yourself. Don’t wait until you’re up against the wall to retain a knowledgeable electronic discovery vendor.

6. There are way too many documents to go through.

In a lawsuit that spans months or years, the volume of discoverable documentation can be immense. Yet, time still needs to be of the essence when it comes to discovery efforts. Electronic discovery can save money and man hours almost exponentially compared to traditional discovery.

7. You have to convert tons of physical documentation into searchable, electronic data.

Electronic discovery vendors have the right equipment and knowledge base to convert large volumes of physical documentation into a far more easily searchable format.

8. You’re tired of telling people you’re not equipped to handle eDiscovery.

As more and more business is conducted digitally, the majority of clients need representation that can provide electronic discovery. It’s time to accept that eDiscovery is becoming status quo.

9. The projected costs of traditional discovery sends your client looking elsewhere for representation.

Traditional discovery methods add up quickly, especially in a big case. While electronic discovery can also be expensive, the costs are much lower comparatively. Adopting new methods now can help you keep your clients’ costs much more manageable.

10. The Court orders you to.

Sound far-fetched? In Multiven, Inc. v. Cisco Sys. (2010), that’s exactly what happened. The Plaintiff insisted on using traditional review and, as a result, was unable to complete discovery by the cutoff date. The Court said discovery was taking “…far too long and a new method for this review and production is needed.” The Defendant was then ordered to engage an eDiscovery vendor and split the total costs with the Plaintiff. In short, even the Court knows that traditional discovery is going the way of the dinosaur.