Monthly Archives: April 2016

5 Reasons Why Legal Firms Must Prioritize Digital Documentation

5 Reasons Why Legal Firms Must Prioritize Digital Documentation

Paper documentation in the legal world is quickly going the way of the rotary phone.

ICO recently reported that legal data security breaches increased from three to four percent last year, with most arising from loss, or theft of paperwork. With the drawbacks of paper documentation increasing, legal firms that have no digital transformation strategy are missing several advantages that digital documents offer.

1. Better Productivity

Digitally searchable documentation can save tremendous amounts of time and worker productivity. Did you know that employees in information-based industries spend an average of 11.2 hours per week creating and managing documents? Worse yet, six are wasted by the inefficient burden of transferring and filing paper documents, hours that could be saved if digital documents were the norm. The inefficiencies of paper filing add up quick.5 Reasons Why Legal Firms Must Prioritize Digital Documentation

The productivity benefits of digital documentation are twofold: digital documents are searchable by variables, such as title or keyword, and can be instantly accessed. They also let multiple users review and amend them at once, saving the time and hassle of physical document transfer between parties.

2. Streamlined Communication

Digital documentation allows faster communication among workers. Any user with an Internet connection can access documents stored digitally in the Cloud, or sent through email. This creates streamlined messaging among parties working on the same project and allows businesses to display real-time updates to clients who have access to the project.

3. A More Mobile Approach

With the legal world becoming increasingly mobile, digital document systems leverage the rise of mobile use by letting lawyers work wherever their phones are. With Cloud-based project management, folders and documents can be shared regardless of geographic location. There’s no worrying about the transportation of physical documents, or concerns about letting papers fall into the wrong hands.

4. Cost Savings

Digital documentation can be an effective way to optimize a physical workspace. Many offices have storage rooms full of old paperwork and files. Digital systems free up space, and can be a lifesaver for small offices with little real estate to spare. 

5. Going Green

Despite the digital push, legal firms are still printing up to 10,000 pages per month. This creates a significant environmental impact on the community. Digital strategies negate the need for large-scale printing and provide a necessary boost to corporate sustainability and the local environment.

Data Security Concerns

Despite the well-documented benefits of digital strategies, many legal firms are reluctant to take the plunge due to their fear of poor digital document security. How can you protect your online information?

Fortunately, digital information governance is affordable and easy to deploy these days. Data security firms can work with legal departments to ensure ironclad digital security for their privileged information, helping firms correctly recycle and destroy their outdated paper files. Taking these security steps will ensure that legal departments are kept safe during their transition to digital documentation.

Dean Van Dyke iBridge LLC

Written by Dean Van Dyke, Vice President, Business Process Optimization

Dean Van Dyke is the Vice President of Business Process Optimization for iBridge. He brings more than 18 years of customer relations, business process outsourcing, lean six sigma, program/project management, records management, manufacturing, and vendor management experience to iBridge. Mr. Van Dyke was the former head of Microsoft’s corporate records and information management team and served honorably for over fourteen years in the U.S. Navy and Army National Guard. He received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of South Dakota and his Master’s in Business Administration from Colorado Technical University.

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Growing Innovation in the Healthcare Technology World

Growing Innovation in the Healthcare Technology World

Digital health systems and applications are making waves in the healthcare world, but their use is still in its infancy.Growing Innovation in the Healthcare Technology World

Higher care quality, better patient outcomes, and overall efficiency are typical benchmarks used to measure, healthcare system efficiency, but most health applications have only shown modest returns on their use. Compounding the problem is the difficulty of measuring patient outcomes across disparate systems; healthcare system leaders are still unsure of how to achieve the maximum returns from healthcare technology.

Healthcare administrators must answer three questions before they can leverage healthcare applications in more practical and economically viable ways:

1. Who should pay for the applications and services?

These days, most applications are cheap or free outright, making patients pay for their own applications may be a barrier to entry. The demand for these applications is high, and consumers are showing more interest in having control over their own health information. However, without demonstrable proof that health application use is linked to better patient outcomes, the cost disbursement of health applications presents a challenge.

2. How do we measure the effectiveness of the outreach?

This is one of the primary underlying issues plaguing healthcare service providers. To justify reimbursement, application providers must prove that their services produce long-term health benefits that translate into economic benefits in the healthcare system. Without standardized measures for patient data collection and review, this analysis is difficult to perform.

3. What framework is necessary for start-ups to implement sustainable and successful health applications?

Creating an accessible IT framework for application developers is the best place to start.

Not approaching healthcare infrastructure as a national priority is a mistake. Each regional health system should consider the use of open innovation platforms that store and provide health data. This framework should be able to integrate with application programming interfaces and other IT services, with the end goal of creating a centralized data platform for health service use.

Starting with top-down solutions like these improve both assessment and delivery of health services while making them more affordable for all parties involved. Though effective in theory, an open innovation platform would require efficient collaboration among multiple parties in each country.

Those responsible for maintaining this platform will need a solid understanding of healthcare management, data security, and collaboration with regulators. Though this is a tall order in a still-growing healthcare IT field, open innovation platforms promise easier collaboration between payers and health application developers than ever before.

Desh Urs iBridge LLC

Written by Desh Urs

Desh Urs brings more than 20 years of entrepreneurial, start-up and Global 500 corporate experience in sales, marketing, and general management to the customers of iBridge. He has led sales organizations as SVP at Qsent, Inc. and VP at Acxiom Corporation, and has focused on the usage of data in data distribution, direct marketing, fraud prevention, and law enforcement.

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decisions Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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It’s (Not) Academic: Cybersecurity Is a Must for Universities and Academic Medical Centers

It’s (Not) Academic: Cybersecurity Is a Must for Universities and Academic Medical Centers

Although cybersecurity has taken a central role for healthcare facilities and legal firms, cybercrime doesn’t discriminate based on industry.

Universities and academic facilities contain sensitive data just as vulnerable to outside intrusion as industries that heavily prioritize security. Student healthcare data, financial information, and other personal details are all at risk in unsecured academic networks. Over the past several years, multiple universities have reported data breaches that had significant impacts to their student body and reputation.

It’s (Not) Academic: Cybersecurity Is a Must for Universities and Academic Medical Centers

The University of Maryland suffered a breach in 2014 that resulted in over 300,000 compromised records, including university IDs and social security numbers. That same year, a breach at Butler University revealed the social security numbers, driver’s license information, and bank account data of over 200,000 individuals.

The financial cost of these breaches is high, but the damage isn’t limited to leaked information. Much as other victims of high-profile breaches (including Sony and Target) have recently learned, the bad PR from a data breach can be catastrophic to an institution.

Threat Prevention

As positive PR is an absolute necessity for academic organizations, a cybersecurity prevention and damage control strategy is essential.

Initial measures for beginning this plan should include:

1. Internal Threat Assessment

With over 50 percent of cyber attacks in 2014 from insiders, institutions must know of internal threats and have measures for threat assessments. This involves creating dedicated teams with representatives from each department who can oversee internal data security in their own divisions.

2. Enhance Security Infrastructure

Academic institutions must upgrade their IT security to discourage hackers. Sensitive information should be protected with authentication credentials, firewalls, and by limiting access to only essential personnel. Better system-wide controls help prevent the unregulated flow of information that cyber breaches rely on.

3. Breach Testing

Many institutions these days test the strength of their security with the help of white hat hackers. These vendors can review the strength of your cybersecurity protocols and offer guidance on where you may be vulnerable.

4. Damage Control Planning

Should a breach occur, institutions must have a plan in place to mitigate the damage. Steps will need to be taken to lock down your system and prevent small data losses from turning into out of control information breaches. This includes disclosure protocols for parties who may be affected by the data loss.

5. Getting Insured

Cyber insurance can help reduce the financial burden of leaks should a breach take place. This can be beneficial for large-scale organizations who handle millions of patient or customer records.

While these steps are a good start for academic organizations without cybersecurity protocols in place, they are only the first steps of a larger, system-wide push towards data security. The threats are here—academic institutions can’t afford to wait.

Desh Urs iBridge LLCWritten by Desh Urs

Desh Urs brings more than 20 years of entrepreneurial, start-up and Global 500 corporate experience in sales, marketing, and general management to the customers of iBridge. He has led sales organizations as SVP at Qsent, Inc. and VP at Acxiom Corporation, and has focused on the usage of data in data distribution, direct marketing, fraud prevention, and law enforcement.

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decisions Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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