Monthly Archives: September 2015

The Coming eDiscovery Tsunami

The Coming eDiscovery Tsunami

Law firms engaged in eDiscovery activities face a daunting task: dealing with the sheer volume of data, the endless emails, word-processing documents, spreadsheets, CAD drawings, and databases that must be examined to unearth those few crucial nuggets of information that can make (or break) a case.

Technology can help, but only to a certain degree. Technology-assisted review (TAR) tools can use advanced text mining algorithms to filter out irrelevant items, but that can still leave an overwhelming number of files that must be examined by a human (or, more likely, a team of humans). And TAR has its limits—can a TAR tool look at a CAD drawing file and decide whether a certain hardware feature relates to a patent claim? Probably not. Simply defining the criteria for what is and is not relevant can be a major challenge.

So even with TAR, the costs of eDiscovery have been on the rise, with law firms adding staff just to deal with the load.

Here’s the bad news: It’s about to get worse.

Monumental Increases in eDiscovery Complexity

Three areas are expected to dramatically complicate gathering and processing eDiscovery data for a case: social media, cloud storage, and mobile devices.

eDiscovery

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

  • Social media: As companies increasingly turn to social media to stay in touch with their customers, eDiscovery will involve more Twitter tweets, Facebook posts, and other data on social media servers. Some of this data is by nature ephemeral; Snapchat, for instance, provides shared items for only a few seconds, after which they are automatically deleted. There are open legal questions regarding ownership of social media data and to what extent social media services can be forced to provide non-public user information. And then the sheer volume of additional data must be reviewed, much of it photos or videos that are difficult to evaluate with TAR tools.
  • Cloud storage: For many reasons involving cost, reliability, and disaster recovery, businesses are taking advantage of cloud storage services to store and process electronic data. Here, the data ownership question is more clear-cut, but there will be exceptions. If a party to a suit doesn’t pay its cloud storage bill, and the cloud service provider deletes their documents, then what? Can the cloud service provide be compelled to provide the documents from backups (if any exist)?
  • Mobile Devices: As phones and tablets become more sophisticated and powerful, more of them are being used for business. Some may be the only place that some relevant documents are stored. Further complicating matters is that companies are increasingly embracing “bring your own device” (BYOD), where employees use their own devices for company business. Some companies have a policy that such devices be wiped of their company data when an employee leaves the firm, and when that data is gone, it’s gone. Even for companies without such a policy, tracking down current and former employees who might have data on their personal devices adds a new and daunting level of complexity to eDiscovery.

We are entering a new era in eDiscovery, where there are few legal precedents and the ability of technology to cope will be severely taxed. The process probably will get harder before it gets easier. So strap in—we’re in for a bumpy ride.

Desh Urs iBridge LLC

Written by Desh Urs

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decision Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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FTC Ruling: Ignorance of Cybersecurity Is Not Defensible

FTC Ruling: Ignorance of Cybersecurity Is Not Defensible

Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act allows the FTC to pursue legal action against individuals who engage in “unfair or deceptive acts or practices affecting commerce.” A recent ruling in the case of Federal Trade Commission v. Wyndham Worldwide Corporation found that the FTC’s authority extends to companies that fail to uphold reasonable cybersecurity standards when protecting private data.

Security Compliance

Often, companies facing legal action from the FTC will settle and agree to outside monitoring as they employ stronger security practices. In Wyndham’s case, the lawsuit came about from three separate data breaches in 2008 and 2009. Wyndham’s network was cracked by hackers, resulting in the loss of personal and financial data of hundreds of thousands of customers. The suit was initiated in 2012 after the FTC claimed that Wyndham had failed to upgrade its cybersecurity to appropriate levels.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

While Wyndham argued that the FTC failed to provide specifics on what security measures needed to be upgraded, the courts decided that preexisting industry guidelines provided sufficient information about how security standards must be upheld.

Potential Liability

The court ruling established two important principles for the future of cybersecurity:

  • Inadequate cybersecurity is actionable under Section 5 of the FTC Act
  • Ignorance of proper security measures is no defense

Companies under the scrutiny of the FTC for questionable security standards face significant liability. The FTC has the authority to pursue three legal remedies for what they consider to be unfair or deceptive legal practices:

  • Civil penalties of no more than $16,000
  • Recovery of losses suffered by consumers who have had their information compromised
  • Legal action to freeze assets, rescind contracts, or appointment of temporary receivers

These legal ramifications are on top of the damages incurred by the initial data breach. With consequences compounding the financial and reputation losses that come alongside data breaches, companies can’t afford to take cybersecurity lightly.

Businesses concerned about the state of their security must assess their current privacy policies and security infrastructure. The FTC might take action against businesses with easily guessed passwords, which failure to monitor for malware, and who fail to follow proper response procedures after an incident occurs. To prevent an audit by the FTC, businesses must be aware of the regulations and make cybersecurity a top priority.

At iBridge, security is a serious topic and we continue to learn and provide information to the industry at-large. If you have a question about cybersecurity liability, legal ramifications regarding security, or other security topics, feel free to contact us or call us at 888.490.3282.

Desh Urs iBridge LLC

Written by Desh Urs

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decision Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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Rise of the “Robocall” and Automated Phishing Scams

Rise of the “Robocall” and Automated Phishing Scams

When faced with an unknown number calling, most people register two facts:

  1. They feel compelled to take the call and see who it is;
  2. They’re wary of answering a number they don’t recognize;

Assuming they answer, sometimes they do so only to find that there’s nobody at the other end. This might not sound like a problem, but what if merely answering the call was part of the scam?

Automated Phishing

Automated phone probes (dubbed “robocalls”) are on the rise due to their cost-efficiency and broad outreach. Scammers can program Skype and other Internet-based phone services to dial numbers automatically and register how many are answered by live people. Once the fraudster knows which numbers are associated with actual people, they target them more aggressively with data phishing scams designed to steal their identity and access banking information.picjumbo.com_HNCK8597

In the modern age of interconnectivity, many of us can’t afford to ignore unknown callers—so how can you safeguard yourself against the increasing number of data-mining robocalls?

Vijay Balasubramaniyan, CEO of Pindrop Security, says private security organizations that contract with financial institutions often have measures to detect such fraudulent activity. By examining several industry-specific clues and rating each call on trustworthiness, security companies can tell location-based information: “This call is supposed to come from a landline in Atlanta, but the audio is telling us it’s a Skype call from West Africa.”

While privatized security can protect the integrity of institutions capable of hiring them, the average person doesn’t have that luxury. As ignoring unknown numbers isn’t always an option, Balasubramaniyan suggests users take particular care when dealing with strange callers. These measures include verifying that the number calling your phone matches the number on the back of your card when dealing with callers claiming to be credit or debit card companies.

The Federal Trade Commission has weighed in on the issue, noting that it’s aware of the rising prevalence of robocalls and is doing what it can to prevent them. The FTC recommends the “just hang up” solution, where people faced with suspicious calls hang up the phone before the scammer can gather information.

The act of answering the call is the first step of the process—but phishers can’t get your information without your input, and being on guard for suspicious phone activity is the best way to keep your information safe.

This is a summary of an article we know is important to recirculate. At iBridge our customers depend on us to keep them abreast of security issues and weak links in this inter-connected world. What happens at work affects your personal life and if you personally fall prey, you bet, your work life is compromised. We may not be able to stop these threats but we can certainly deal with it better once we are aware.

Desh Urs iBridge LLC

Written by Desh Urs

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decision Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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Register now for SHN’s Fraud Prevention and Consolidation Seminar

Register now for SHN’s Fraud Prevention and Consolidation Seminar

iBridge is a co-sponsor of the upcoming free seminar “Fraud Prevention and Consolidation – Protecting Your Financial Future,” hosted by The Seattle Healthcare Network (SHN).

This free seminar helps healthcare professionals avoid fraud in your practice with examples of real life cases and how they could have been prevented. The seminar will focus on the continuing trend of consolidation and there will be a round table discussion about ICD-10 readiness.

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Seminar Details:

Date/Time: October 15, 2015 – 7:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Location: EQ Conference Center at 5580 Pacific Highway East Fife, Washington, 98424

Register now – space is limited! Please RSVP by September 30th with seattlehealthcarenetwork@gmail.com or register online.

Seminar Details and Agenda

There will be two sessions during the conference. The first will focus on recent trends in healthcare transactions, particularly focusing on how the regulatory environment is affecting transactions, and the factors that could affect transactions. It will be led by Calvin Swartley, who is a member of the Valuation & Litigation Services Group of Moss Adams, LLP.

The second session will focus on fraud prevention, and will provide multiple real life examples of instances where fraud was perpetrated in a healthcare organization. Attendees will learn how best practices would have prevented these losses. This session will be led by Lisa Hoglan, who is a Partner at Moss Adams.

Below is the agenda for the seminar..

Agenda

  • 7:30-8:00 Registration, Free Buffet Breakfast and Networking
  • 8:00-9:15 Presentation by Calvin Swartley, Moss Adams
  • 9:15-9:45 Break & Networking
  • 9:45-11:00 Presentation by Lisa Hoglan, Moss Adams
  • 11:00-11:45 Round Table Discussion
  • 11:45-12:00 Prize Drawing and Networking

Click here to register now!

Innovation in the Legal World and the Need for a New Perspective

Innovation in the Legal World and the Need for a New Perspective

In the wake of several high profile data breaches that have recently occurred, the public eye has turned its crosshairs on the outdated technology and clichéd business practices that exist in the legal world.

Legal firms have tried to keep up with the developing technological needs of their industry, but their efforts have traditionally fallen short. With practices deeply rooted in tradition and held sacred by many lawyers, innovation in the legal world is scarce.

Law as Business

The most recent Inside Counsel SuperConference held on May 12th of this year discussed the need for technological improvements in the legal world, with many industry insiders agreeing that law firms must function more as businesses and apply a new mindset to the way they handle in-house counsel.

Legal firms on the cutting edge have already been using technology to inform their legal practice in the same ways that businesses have. By gathering data on legal competition and using predictive analytics to measure future outcomes, firms have received an enhanced level of insight into the legal process that outdated firms can’t match. Pairing these business practices with in-house legal goals means better informed lawyers, more prepared counsel, and a stronger overall firm.picjumbo.com_9814538046_86523fdb81_o

“Technology is pervasive,” said David Cambria, global director of operations and government relations at Archer Daniels Midland Company. “I think you are going to see a lot of adoption of technologies or ideas in lot of places …Innovation is a message that resonates with any business.”

Developing Innovation

Lawyers entering the industry fresh out of law school bring with them changing trends for the legal world.

Many of the practicing lawyers received their education well before the advent of the Internet, creating a legal environment where new and innovative technology isn’t prioritized. However, young lawyers whose legal training went hand-in-hand with technology use are bringing changes to the way legal counsel is handled though social media outreach, more efficient data management, and productivity-saving applications.

While firms resistant to change may hold off on implementing new technology until they can verify its efficacy, they may find that by the time they’re ready for change, they’re already too late. Early adoption is a key part of innovation. Technology is developing fast, and legal firms that don’t want to fall behind must stay ahead of the curve.

Our endeavor at iBridge is to provide a forum for firm leadership to dialogue as they weigh transformation strategies. While it easy for someone from the outside to preach on change, facilitating change while keeping the firm solvent and growing is difficult. We can offer counsel and guide the process. Contacting us or calling us at 888.490.3282 is the first step in the right direction.

Desh Urs iBridge LLC

Written by Desh Urs

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decision Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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The Middle Ground Between Security and Patient Care

The Middle Ground Between Security and Patient Care

While the goals of strong IT security and effective HIPAA compliance are necessary for the success of every healthcare clinic, some organizations find that stringently applying these initiatives comes at a cost.

Though strong security measures protect patient information, they correlate with decreased ease of use—and as IT security and privacy become bigger priorities for healthcare clinics, physicians find that overbearing security measures are preventing them from doing their jobs.

The Middle Ground Between Security and Patient Care

Image courtesy of Zirconicusso at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

However, better security doesn’t need to come at the cost of quality patient care. The goals of increased HIPAA compliance and network safety can be addressed with the needs of the workforce in mind to create a harmonious relationship between clinical practice and security.

Building Communication

The first step of designing security protocols in the healthcare field is to understand the environment and culture of each practice. The most effective security system for patient privacy may not be the most user-friendly to those who need it—creating infrastructure problems that prevent clinicians from meeting the needs of their patients.

To prevent security from interfering with patient care, CIOs should have an open dialogue with the physicians and employees who work within the system. These first-hand accounts can help security personnel determine what areas of the user interface should be left untouched, and what areas can be improved without interruption of service.

The key to balancing daily practice and security is the shared knowledge between those who design security standards and those who work around them.

Seamless Integration

When security personnel understand the challenges and needs of those who use their system, integrating security into daily operation becomes an easier feat.

While a balance must be struck between security compliance and user access, both goals can be accomplished with creative implementation of security practices that don’t interfere with daily practice.

For example, nurses are using touch access to gain admittance to privileged information located on mobile devices. Rather than remembering security codes for regularly accessed databases of patient information, security personnel created a system where fingerprint recognition is the only verification needed. This clinician-focused security is HIPAA compliant, keeps information safe, and doesn’t disrupt the daily flow of work.

Patient care and IT security is a constant tug of war. However, with open dialogue and information exchange, neither quality of care or patient privacy needs to be sacrificed to meet the clinic’s goals.

With the prevalence of IT breaches that occur in-house, proper training of staff is essential. This includes appointing a chief information security officer to oversee IT security, preferably an employee knowing security issues in healthcare and security auditing experience.

At iBridge, security is a serious topic and we continue to learn and provide information to the industry at-large. If you have a question about HIPAA assessments, compliance requirements and other security topics, feel free to contact us or call us at 888.490.3282.

Dean Van Dyke iBridge LLC

Written by Dean Van Dyke, Vice President, Business Process Optimization

Dean Van Dyke is the Vice President of Business Process Optimization for iBridge. He brings more than 18 years of customer relations, business process outsourcing, lean six sigma, program/project management, records management, manufacturing, and vendor management experience to iBridge. Mr. Van Dyke was the former head of Microsoft’s corporate records and information management team, and served honorably for over fourteen years in the U.S. Navy and Army National Guard. He received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of South Dakota and his Master’s in Business Administration from Colorado Technical University.

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8 Cybersecurity Trends the Healthcare Industry Must Pay Attention To

8 Cybersecurity Trends the Healthcare Industry Must Pay Attention To

As emerging technology changes the landscape of information security in healthcare, health organizations must ensure that their policies stay up to date to protect the privacy and security of patient information.

According to a joint study conducted by Information Security Media Group and email data security company, Zix Corp., many healthcare organizations believe they are meeting this goal—but key findings of the survey highlight the unpreparedness that many organizations face, and reveal several developing trends for healthcare providers to know of.

1. Awareness of Emerging Threats

Over a quarter (28 percent) of survey responders agreed that while hackers are a significant threat, the bigger security risk comes from in-house employees failing to meet basic security standards. Proper training of personnel is essential for HIPAA compliance.

2. Shifting Priorities

While the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is prioritizing EHR interoperability, survey responders indicated that other issues were of more concern:

  • Increased regulatory compliance
  • Better security awareness and training
  • Prevention and detection of breaches
  • Updating business continuity/disaster strategies
  • Monitoring HIPAA compliance of associates

3. Mobile Protection

Lost or unencrypted mobile devices are often the culprit behind data breaches. The best way to avoid unauthorized access is to keep privileged data off mobile devices when possible, and to maintain good security practices when mobile use is unavoidable.picjumbo.com_HNCK2614

4. Restrict Data Access

Increased regulation for data access is necessary to improve security. This includes multi-factor authentication and encryption of remotely-accessed data, and restriction of who has access to confidential information.

5. Better Risk Assessments

Thorough assessments of risk are necessary for HIPAA compliance. These audits typically result in updated and revised security practices, including the use of new security technology and educational initiatives.

6. No Cloud Confidence

Only 64 percent of survey respondents store data in the cloud, reflecting a fear of unauthorized remote access of privileged data. Only one-third of respondents claimed confidence in their vendor’s security standards.

7. Better Security Strategies

While security frameworks and policies are essential to information privacy, survey responders revealed that 40 percent of organizations still lack a documented security strategy.

8. Trained Staff

With the prevalence of IT breaches that occur in-house, proper training of staff is essential. This includes appointing a chief information security officer to oversee IT security, preferably an employee knowing security issues in healthcare and security auditing experience.

At iBridge, security is a serious topic and we continue to learn and provide information to the industry at-large. If you have a question about HIPAA assessments, compliance requirements and other security topics, feel free to contact us.

Dean Van Dyke iBridge LLC

Written by Dean Van Dyke, Vice President, Business Process Optimization

Dean Van Dyke is the Vice President of Business Process Optimization for iBridge. He brings more than 18 years of customer relations, business process outsourcing, lean six sigma, program/project management, records management, manufacturing, and vendor management experience to iBridge. Mr. Van Dyke was the former head of Microsoft’s corporate records and information management team, and served honorably for over fourteen years in the U.S. Navy and Army National Guard. He received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of South Dakota and his Master’s in Business Administration from Colorado Technical University.

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The Growing Shift Toward a Manufacturing-Based Healthcare System

The Growing Shift Toward a Manufacturing-Based Healthcare System

A new administrative strategy is being adopted by public hospitals that promises to change the practice of healthcare management. This overhaul comes from car-manufacturing giant Toyota, which believes that the lean efficiency of car production can apply to healthcare with the goals of higher efficiency and better quality of service.

This strategy, dubbed “Toyotism,” involves an administrative overhaul that offers new methods for handling patients, storing equipment, and scheduling surgeries.

Streamlining Healthcare

This “lean” model of healthcare has already been implemented in states like Washington and Wisconsin, though its use has been restricted to private hospitals. However, the recent establishment of the Affordable Care Act has broadened Toyota’s reach by instituting guaranteed health insurance for the whole population. This creates pressure on “safety net” clinics to keep their historically low-income population from going to other clinics for care.

The Growing Shift Toward a Manufacturing-Based Healthcare System

Susan Black, one of Toyota’s chief improvement promotion officers, spoke to how the adjustments reflect “[…] a real need to do better, to do more, improve our access and do it for less.”

However, not everybody is on board with the policy changes.

Medical professionals in California and other locations claim that Toyota’s assembly-line manufacturing model of service does not translate to quality patient care. DeAnne McEwen, health and safety specialist with National Nurses United, claimed that the Toyotism model of production devalues the practice of nursing:

“[…] Nursing care is not a commodity but a service. It’s a process that requires critical thinking and the application of judgment.”

Continuous Improvement

Those in favor of the change cite the similarities between healthcare and auto manufacturing, including the need for organization and easilyaccessible materials.

“There was a clear translation,” said Toyota advisor Toshi Kitamura, who highlighted how the increased efficiency found from optimized healthcare procedures can save patient lives.

These results were visible at Harbor-UCLA, an outpatient ophthalmology clinic that recently adopted these changes. Before the switch, administrators claimed that patients were losing irreplaceable vision while waiting for surgeries to be scheduled. After the overhaul, the number of new patients seen at the public clinic each day has doubled, with the time spent in clinic for each being halved.

While the benefits of a manufacturing-based healthcare system are debatable at this early stage, the willingness to try new methods of practice is an encouraging sign in an industry that has traditionally been adverse to change.

Dean Van Dyke iBridge LLC

Written by Dean Van Dyke, Vice President, Business Process Optimization

Dean Van Dyke is the Vice President of Business Process Optimization for iBridge. He brings more than 18 years of customer relations, business process outsourcing, lean six sigma, program/project management, records management, manufacturing, and vendor management experience to iBridge. Mr. Van Dyke was the former head of Microsoft’s corporate records and information management team, and served honorably for over fourteen years in the U.S. Navy and Army National Guard. He received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of South Dakota and his Master’s in Business Administration from Colorado Technical University.

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Industry Insiders on Responsible eDiscovery

Industry Insiders on Responsible eDiscovery

Is eDiscovery a practice too risky for continued use in the legal world?

This is the sentiment voiced by Andy Wilson, CEO of the automated eDiscovery service provider Logikcull, who characterized the process as a “stain on our legal system” in an open letter to legal practitioners.

eDiscovery Logistics

Wilson argued that the expense and complication of eDiscovery makes the practice unhelpful to legal firms and forces fast settlements between parties that cannot afford prolonged litigation. Despite the positive reception that Wilson claims his letter received, he reined in his comments during a recent statement:

“We are obviously not calling for the end of the discovery process or the exchange of electronic information—which is an intractable part of litigation,” he said. “What we are calling out is the waste, inefficiency, antiquated workflows, extreme cost and poor technology that comprise the eDiscovery category of solutions, services and processes.”locikcull

While Wilson’s radical views on eDiscovery give a voice to the legal practitioners frustrated with the practice, it remains unlikely that industry-wide changes will be made any time soon. Geoffrey Vance, litigation partner at Perkins Coie and chair of his firm’s eDiscovery practice, was quick to dismiss Wilson’s claims that eDiscovery was wasteful.

“While eDiscovery can be costly and risky if done wrong, the risk and cost associated with eDiscovery are at all-time lows, while the ability to identify and analyze electronically stored information is far better than in the paper discovery days,” he said.

Responsible Discovery

Though both experts have differing viewpoints, both make the same argument—eDiscovery, when poorly handled, creates unnecessary drains on time and finances. Neither professional is arguing for the complete removal of eDiscovery (as Wilson was quick to point out in a rebuttal to the original article where his initial comments were posted), but rather a revival of the way eDiscovery is handled in this digital age.

Wilson maintains that the cloud-based discovery platform provided by Logikcull does not avoid the process of discovery, but streamlines the process for increased security, simplicity and affordability—goals that his open letter stressed as eDiscovery priorities.

In a fast-expanding digital landscape where cybercrime is rising, this increased security and simplicity may be all that some firms can hope for.

Desh Urs iBridge LLC

Written by Desh Urs

As a Vice President of Global Sales, Services, and Marketing at Silicon Graphics, Inc., Urs managed engineering and non-engineering functions, developing solutions in sciences, telecommunications, manufacturing, media, business, and defense intelligence, for companies with revenues of several billion dollars. During his tenure as Vice President at Think Tools AG and Brio Technology, Inc., he ran business development and alliances providing solutions in Business Intelligence and Decision Cycle Management to Global 100 corporations worldwide. In the late 1980s, Urs founded Indus Systems, Inc., which he profitably sold to a systems integration company.

Urs serves on several Advisory Boards, as well as many company Boards, in the United States and India.

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